Let the flood gates open

As the Dunleith Community Garden gains popularity in the media, I figured it was time to start updating everyone on our progress. That’s right! You will now be able to read weekly updates on the garden, including (but not limited to) watering schedules, volunteer needs, decorative additions and general growth updates. As Dawn and Justin shared their experiences at Growing Power and their expanding knowledge, hopefully I will be able to capture a snapshot of local food in Greensboro and our ongoing projects.

If you’ve walked by the Dunleith Community Garden, you can clearly see that a lot has occurred since our groundbreaking on June 20th, 2009. (Has it really only been 2 months?!) Since that joyous day, we have planted tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, numerous herbs, basil, and so much more. Everything really seemed to take on a life of its own–even though it was very late for a summer planting. Attributed to this abundant growth was the vital necessity of any garden: water. During the last couple months, neighbors of the Dunleith Community Garden have graciously donated water to this project. By stretching hoses from across the street, volunteers were able to hand water all of the plants–sometimes taking as long as 2-3 hours in watering. We are extremely thankful for these neighbors and the volunteers that fought over 200 feet of hose!

The last day that water flowed on the Dunleith property was in the 60’s, before the demolition of the house on the property. Almost 50 years later, Urban Harvest Sweat Equity project in partnership with Aycock Historic Neighborhood have brought back WATER! This morning we will have water once more. This is a tremendous feat, not only because of the number of years that have passed, but also because of what this water will now produce.  This garden in not state-funded, being paid for by the members of the Aycock Historic Neighborhood and Urban Harvest Sweat Equity Project.  Providing all soil amendments, compost, weeding, edging, and general maintenance, UH-SEP is striving to teach the community how to grow food and in turn, creating a sustainable community.

By involving the entire Aycock Historic Neighborhood, surrounding neighborhoods and local restaurants, we are hoping to create a community with the knowledge to feed itself. As a non-profit corporation, UH-SEP will insure individualized education, workshops and over productive food will directly impact the community that we are serving. Now, with the addition of water on this historic site, let the flood gates open (metaphorically, of course) and the hard work continue! Please join in and celebrate all of the hard work that we have ALL accomplished to come this far.

Please continue to check back for weekly communication.

Sarah Brewer “Urban Harvest Sweat Equity Project”

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