Posts Tagged ‘"North Carolina"’

CEFS Internship

For all of you young’ns wanting to get involved in local food this is a great opportunity.

The Center for Environmental Farming Systems (CEFS) is seeking highly-motivated undergraduate students from a variety of different backgrounds, with a strong interest in sustainable agriculture, to participate in a unique 8-week summer internship (June 6-July 29, 2011).  CEFS summer interns will learn about the concepts and practices of various aspects of sustainable agriculture from expert faculty and staff at CEFS and through hands-on farm work, lectures and discussions, community engagement, and field trips to local farms and markets.  Additionally, students will work in pairs with a CEFS faculty mentor to learn about an aspect of sustainable agriculture research.

For more information please see: http://www.cefs.ncsu.edu/getinvolved/internships.html

The deadline for applications is Tuesday, March 1, 2011.

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Growing more than veggies

We’re all aware of fads. They seep into our fashion, our reading, and our vocabulary. Most fads I can do without (leggings, IM-speak, side ponytails) but a new awareness of the environment mixed with an urgent call to action has produced a fad of new vocabulary that’s creeping into every corner of our lives. The terms “green”, “organic”, and “local” have become staples in this ecologically minded movement and are next to impossible to avoid.  Though there’s much debate about the determining values behind these words, the only word that this particular post concerns itself  with is ‘local.’

Greensboro, though typically slow to jump on the proverbial bandwagon, has really embraced the ideology and production of local food. (Our definition of “local” is within a 150 mile radius of Greensboro. This food is typically considered coming from small production farms and may or may not be grown in a certified Organic environment.) From an increase in foot traffic through the Curb Market to several restaurants featuring locally grown produce, Greensboro is keeping step in a movement that will last longer than snap bracelets or Tickle Me Elmo. I’m glad to support the efforts of the “Gate City” and want to highlight a few local establishments that have gone above and beyond to promote a localized food movement.

Mentioned first (and properly so) is the Curb Market. This is a place where farmer’s come to sell their veggies and vendors tote their local produce. Here one can find a variety of vegetables, fruits, prepared goods, breads, cheeses, meats and flowers. Table 16 is a restaurant located in downtown Greensboro. The menu is constantly changing and touting many local, in-season dishes. If your taste buds haven’t yet delighted in the cooking of chef Graham Heaton, I strongly recommend checking it out. For locally milled flour (not lucky enough to have it locally grown – yet) visit The Old Mill of Guilford. The Old Mill is a great resource for flour, cornmeal and GREAT recipes; I always leave with something new to bake!

Those are a few of the MANY Greensboro hot spots dealing in local food. Please check out Slow Food Piedmont for a list of more restaurants, farms and stores that carry local products. We’re always looking for more recommendations—let us know if you have a favorite place that has local food.

Fall Harvest

It’s hard to imagine because we’ve been dealing with soaring temperatures recently, but Autumn is quickly on its way! It seems like just as we can’t take anymore of the high temperatures and humidity, Fall steps in to give us a breath of relief. But with this much anticipated temperature change comes a change in the Garden.

Now is the time to start thinking about the yummy veggies that we will be enjoying in a few weeks. Plants such as carrots, broccoli, onions, cabbage and lettuce will be thriving in our gardens and filling our plates in a short amount of time. As a gardener, this is one of the most exciting times! It’s always thrilling to see large growth in the garden that you’ve started, but there is a different energy that comes with planning where and how the garden will be set up.  Whether it be the reassurance of the seed catalogs that make you feel like you CAN grow anything or the control of planning out just where the plants will find their final resting ground, a change in harvest time brings about a renewal of energy for us.

For the next few weeks you will be able to see us at Dunleith Community Garden pulling the spent summer plants and planning for the future. If you feel like you need to be re-energized towards your personal garden or you’re looking for general knowledge on how to plant a Fall harvest, feel free to stop by Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4pm-7pm to talk to us.  For more information on the Fall plants that you can start and how to prepare for a Fall garden visit this website: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-8001.html

Let the flood gates open

As the Dunleith Community Garden gains popularity in the media, I figured it was time to start updating everyone on our progress. That’s right! You will now be able to read weekly updates on the garden, including (but not limited to) watering schedules, volunteer needs, decorative additions and general growth updates. As Dawn and Justin shared their experiences at Growing Power and their expanding knowledge, hopefully I will be able to capture a snapshot of local food in Greensboro and our ongoing projects.

If you’ve walked by the Dunleith Community Garden, you can clearly see that a lot has occurred since our groundbreaking on June 20th, 2009. (Has it really only been 2 months?!) Since that joyous day, we have planted tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, numerous herbs, basil, and so much more. Everything really seemed to take on a life of its own–even though it was very late for a summer planting. Attributed to this abundant growth was the vital necessity of any garden: water. During the last couple months, neighbors of the Dunleith Community Garden have graciously donated water to this project. By stretching hoses from across the street, volunteers were able to hand water all of the plants–sometimes taking as long as 2-3 hours in watering. We are extremely thankful for these neighbors and the volunteers that fought over 200 feet of hose!

The last day that water flowed on the Dunleith property was in the 60’s, before the demolition of the house on the property. Almost 50 years later, Urban Harvest Sweat Equity project in partnership with Aycock Historic Neighborhood have brought back WATER! This morning we will have water once more. This is a tremendous feat, not only because of the number of years that have passed, but also because of what this water will now produce.  This garden in not state-funded, being paid for by the members of the Aycock Historic Neighborhood and Urban Harvest Sweat Equity Project.  Providing all soil amendments, compost, weeding, edging, and general maintenance, UH-SEP is striving to teach the community how to grow food and in turn, creating a sustainable community.

By involving the entire Aycock Historic Neighborhood, surrounding neighborhoods and local restaurants, we are hoping to create a community with the knowledge to feed itself. As a non-profit corporation, UH-SEP will insure individualized education, workshops and over productive food will directly impact the community that we are serving. Now, with the addition of water on this historic site, let the flood gates open (metaphorically, of course) and the hard work continue! Please join in and celebrate all of the hard work that we have ALL accomplished to come this far.

Please continue to check back for weekly communication.

Sarah Brewer “Urban Harvest Sweat Equity Project”

Urban Harvest’s Vision for Greensboro

This News & Record video was released on Friday as a preview to a piece for release on Sunday. The interview with Co-Founder Daniel Leiker discusses Urban Harvest’s involvement with the Dunleith Community Garden site, and how Dunleith is a piece of our vision to work with Greensboro to “provide access to local food for all it’s citizens.”

Watch the video here.

Then read the article “A growing revolution: Urban gardens are changing the landscape” about more urban farming and local food initiatives in Greensboro and around North Carolina.

June Press

Urban Harvest has been getting a bit of press recently. First, on May 29th we were featured in the Triad Business Journal in their piece about green businesses. Unforunately the article is for paid subscribers, so I’ll post the article here when I get a copy. And today we were front and center of the News and Record, with an interview with Daniel on the upcoming plans for the Dunleith site and our proposed use. Check em out, and keep your eye open for more to come.

Kitchen Cabinet

Daniel and I have been talking about this very same thing recently. This seems like a common-sense solution and gets at many of the key issues dealing with energy policy, food security, and economic security. I would like to see the White House set a strong example for the rest of the nation to follow, as they have done in the past.

Locally, the second meeting of the Guilford County Community Garden “task force” will be a meeting on February 4th at 3pm. The meeting will be held at 3309 Burlington Rd, the Guilford County Cooperative Extension Office. The first meeting looked at currently existing community gardens in the city,  resources in the community, and the need for more gardens at numerous locations. It was mentioned on several occasions that Guilford County has a high rate of obesity/diabetes, and that its citizens need access to healthier food options. Come to the meeting and share your thoughts and ideas.